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What's New in Science - More news
  • WHO issues roadmap to scale up international response to the Ebola outbreak i...
    The World Health Organization has issued a roadmap to guide and coordinate the international response to the outbreak of Ebola virus disease in west Africa. The aim is to stop ongoing Ebola transmission worldwide within 6-9 months, while rapidly managing the consequences of any further international...
  • Copper shines as flexible conductor
    By turning instead to copper, both abundant and cheap, researchers have developed a way of making flexible conductors cost-effective enough for commercial application.
  • Astrophysicists report radioactive cobalt in supernova explosion
    Astrophysicists have detected the formation of radioactive cobalt during a supernova explosion, lending credence to a corresponding theory of supernova explosions.
  • Simpler process to grow germanium nanowires could improve lithium-ion batteries
    Researchers have developed what they call ?a simple, one-step method? to grow nanowires of germanium from an aqueous solution. Their process could make it more feasible to use germanium in lithium-ion batteries.
  • Breakthrough in light sources for new quantum technology
    One of the most promising technologies for future quantum circuits are photonic circuits, i.e. circuits based on light (photons) instead of electrons (electronic circuits). First, it is necessary to create a stream of single photons and control their direction. Researchers have now succeeded in crea...
  • Plug 'n' play protein crystals
    Almost a hundred years ago in 1929 Linus Pauling presented the famous Pauling?s Rules to describe the principles governing the structure of complex ionic crystals. These rules essentially describe how the arrangement of atoms in a crystal is critically dependent on the size of the atoms, their charg...
  • Danish museum discovers unique gift from Charles Darwin
    The Natural History Museum of Denmark recently discovered a unique gift from one of the greatest-ever scientists. In 1854, Charles Darwin ? father of the theory of evolution ? sent a gift to his Danish colleague Japetus Steenstrup, director of the Royal Museum of Natural History. Until very recently...
  • How nerve cells communicate with each other over long distances: Travelling b...
    How nerve cells within the brain communicate with each other over long distances has puzzled scientists for decades. The way networks of neurons connect and how individual cells react to incoming pulses in principle makes communication over large distances impossible. Scientists provide now a possib...
  • Precision control of the timing, structure and functions in molecular self-as...
    Scientists have developed a new methodology that can easily and precisely control the timing of and the structure as well as functions obtained in self-assembly of ?-conjugated molecules, which is a key technology in the field of organic electronics materials.
  • Snails tell of the rise and fall of the Tibetan Plateau
    The rise of the Tibetan plateau -- the largest topographic anomaly above sea level on Earth -- is important for both its profound effect on climate and its reflection of continental dynamics. Scientists have now employed a cutting-edge geochemical tool -- "clumped" isotope thermometry -- using moder...
  • The universal 'anger face': Each element makes you look physically stronger a...
    The next time you get really mad, take a look in the mirror. See the lowered brow, the thinned lips and the flared nostrils? That's what social scientists call the "anger face," and it appears to be part of our basic biology as humans. Now, researchers have identified the functional advantages that ...
  • NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope witnesses asteroid smashup
    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has spotted an eruption of dust around a young star, possibly the result of a smashup between large asteroids. This type of collision can eventually lead to the formation of planets.
  • Researchers use NASA and other data to look into the heart of a solar storm
    Scientists found that the CME contained a rare piece of dense solar filament material. This filament coupled with an unusually fast speed led to the large amount of solar material observed.
  • Flapping baby birds give clues to origin of flight
    The origin of flight is a contentious issue: some argue that tree-climbing dinosaurs learned to fly in order to avoid hard falls. Others favor the story that theropod dinosaurs ran along the ground and pumped their forelimbs to gain lift, eventually talking off. New evidence showing the early develo...
  • Second-hand e-cig smoke compared to regular cigarette smoke
    Second-hand e-cig smoke has 10 times less particulate matter than regular cigarette smoke; but higher levels of certain toxic metals, a new study finds.
  • Watching the structure of glass under pressure
    Glass has many applications that call for different properties, such as resistance to thermal shock or to chemically harsh environments. Glassmakers commonly use additives such as boron oxide to tweak these properties by changing the atomic structure of glass. Now researchers have for the first time...
  • How the zebrafish gets its stripes: Uncovering how beautiful color patterns c...
    The zebrafish, a small fresh water fish, owes its name to a striking pattern of blue stripes alternating with golden stripes. Three major pigment cell types, black cells, reflective silvery cells, and yellow cells emerge during growth in the skin of the tiny juvenile fish and arrange as a multi-laye...
  • Prehistoric migrations: DNA study unravels the settlement history of the New ...
    A new DNA study unravels the settlement history of the New World Arctic. We know people have lived in the New World Arctic for about 5,000 years. Archaeological evidence clearly shows that a variety of cultures survived the harsh climate in Alaska, Canada and Greenland for thousands of years. Despit...
  • Home is where the microbes are
    A person's home is their castle, and they populate it with their own subjects: millions and millions of bacteria. Scientists have detailed the microbes that live in houses and apartments. The results shed light on the complicated interaction between humans and the microbes that live on and around us...
  • New research reveals how wild rabbits were genetically transformed into tame ...
    The genetic changes that transformed wild animals into domesticated forms have long been a mystery. An international team of scientists has now made a breakthrough by showing that many genes controlling the development of the brain and the nervous system were particularly important for rabbit domest...
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