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What's New in Science - More news
  • Revolutionary microshutter technology hurdles significant challenges
    NASA technologists have hurdled a number of significant technological challenges in their quest to improve an already revolutionary observing technology originally created for the James Webb Space Telescope.
  • NASA-funded X-ray instrument settles interstellar debate
    New findings from a NASA-funded instrument have resolved a decades-old puzzle about a fog of low-energy X-rays observed over the entire sky. Thanks to refurbished detectors first flown on a NASA sounding rocket in the 1970s, astronomers have now confirmed the long-held suspicion that much of this gl...
  • Weighing the Milky Way: Researchers devise precise method for calculating the...
    Does the Milky Way look fat in this picture? Has Andromeda been taking skinny selfies? Using a new, more accurate method for measuring the mass of galaxies, and international group of researchers has shown that the Milky Way has half the Mass of the Andromeda Galaxy.
  • Prehistoric dairy farming at the extremes
    Finland's love of milk has been traced back to 2500 BC, thanks to high-tech techniques to analyze residues preserved in fragments of ancient pots.
  • World's smallest propeller could be used for microscopic medicine
    Scientists have created robots that are only nanometers in length, small enough to maneuver inside the human body and possibly inside human cells.
  • Vision-correcting display makes reading glasses so yesterday
    Researchers are developing vision-correcting displays that can compensate for a viewer's visual impairments to create sharp images without the need for glasses or contact lenses. The technology could potentially help those who currently need corrective lenses to use their smartphones, tablets and co...
  • Huge waves measured for first time in Arctic Ocean
    The first measurements of waves in the middle of the Arctic Ocean recorded house-sized waves during a September 2012 storm. More sensors are going out this summer to study waves in newly ice-free Arctic waters.
  • Mysterious molecules in space: Silicon-capped hydrocarbons may be source of '...
    New research has offered a tantalizing new possibility in the realm of interstellar molecules and diffuse interstellar bands: these mysterious molecules may be silicon-capped hydrocarbons like SiC3H, SiC4H and SiC5H.
  • 'Killer sperm' prevents mating between worm species
    Most cross-species mating is merely unsuccessful in producing offspring. However, when researchers mated Caenorhabditis worms of different species, they found that the lifespan of the female worms and their number of progeny were drastically reduced compared with females that mated with the same spe...
  • Watching neurons fire from a front-row seat
    They are with us every moment of every day, controlling every action we make, from the breath we breathe to the words we speak, and yet there is still a lot we don't know about the cells that make up our nervous systems. When things go awry and nerve cells don't communicate as they should, the conse...
  • Brainwaves can predict audience reaction of television programming
    By analyzing the brainwaves of 16 individuals as they watched mainstream television content, researchers were able to accurately predict the preferences of large TV audiences, up to 90 percent in the case of Super Bowl commercials.
  • Brand-specific television alcohol ads a significant predictor of brand consum...
    Underage drinkers are three times more likely to drink alcohol brands that advertise on television programs they watch compared to other alcohol brands, providing new and compelling evidence of a strong association between alcohol advertising and youth drinking behavior.
  • A new way to make microstructured surfaces: Method can produce strong, lightw...
    A team of researchers has created a new way of manufacturing microstructured surfaces that have novel three-dimensional textures. These surfaces, made by self-assembly of carbon nanotubes, could exhibit a variety of useful properties -- including controllable mechanical stiffness and strength, or th...
  • Tough foam from tiny sheets: Lab uses atom-thick materials to make ultralight...
    Tough, ultralight foam of atom-thick sheets can be made to any size and shape through a new chemical process. In microscopic images, the foam dubbed "GO-0.5BN" looks like a nanoscale building, with floors and walls that reinforce each other. The structure consists of a pair of two-dimensional materi...
  • The Quantum Cheshire Cat: Can neutrons be located at a different place than t...
    Can neutrons be located at a different place than their own spin? A quantum experiment demonstrates a new kind of quantum paradox. The Cheshire Cat featured in Lewis Caroll's novel "Alice in Wonderland" is a remarkable creature: it disappears, leaving its grin behind. Can an object be separated from...
  • Do your stem cells sound like cancer? While-you-wait, non-invasive cancer dia...
    Converting stem cell data into sounds could enable GPs to make instant, non-invasive cancer diagnoses during a routine check-up. A recent study shows how data sonification (where data is conveyed as audio signals as opposed to visual illustrations such as graphs) can improve standard techniques curr...
  • Social origins of intelligence in the brain
    By studying the injuries and aptitudes of Vietnam War veterans who suffered penetrating head wounds during the war, scientists are tackling -- and beginning to answer -- longstanding questions about how the brain works. The researchers found that brain regions that contribute to optimal social funct...
  • Diet affects males' and females' gut microbes differently
    The microbes living in the guts of males and females react differently to diet, even when the diets are identical, according to a new study. These results suggest that therapies designed to improve human health and treat diseases through nutrition might need to be tailored for each sex.
  • Autistic brain less flexible at taking on tasks
    The brains of children with autism are relatively inflexible at switching from rest to task performance, according to a new brain-imaging study.
  • Famine in the Horn of Africa (1984) was caused by El Nino and currents in the...
    Oceanic patterns are important drivers of climatic variability. There is a clear link between periods of drought in the North Ethiopian Highlands and oceanic phases of El Nino, the Indian Ocean Dipole and the Southwestern Monsoons.
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