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What's New in Science - More news
  • Lost memories might be able to be restored, suggests research into marine snail
    New research indicates that lost memories can be restored, according to new research into a type of marine snail called Aplysia. The findings offer some hope for patients in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease.
  • New species found in the deepest trench on Earth
    Researchers have returned from the first detailed study of the Mariana Trench aboard Schmidt Ocean Institute's research vessel Falkor. The expedition set many new records, including the deepest rock samples ever collected and the discovery of new fish species at the greatest depths ever recorded.
  • Atom-thick CCD could capture images
    An atomically thin material may lead to the thinnest-ever imaging platform. Synthetic two-dimensional materials based on metal chalcogenide compounds could be the basis for superthin devices.
  • Early exposure to antidepressants affects adult anxiety, serotonin transmission
    Early developmental exposure to two different antidepressants, Prozac and Lexapro, has been studied by researchers in a mouse model that mimics human third trimester medication exposure. They found that, although these serotonin-selective reuptake inhibiting antidepressants were thought to work the ...
  • New technique reveals immune cell motion
    Neutrophils, cells recruited by the immune system to fight infection, need to move through a great variety of tissues. New research shows how neutrophils move through confined spaces in the body. A new system can mimic tissues of different densities and stiffness, enabling improved development and t...
  • Reducing emergency surgery cuts health care costs
    Researchers have determined the hospital costs and risk of death for emergency surgery and compared it to the same operation when performed in a planned, elective manner for three common surgical procedures: abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, coronary artery bypass graft and colon resection. The rese...
  • Technophobia may keep seniors from using apps to manage diabetes
    Despite showing interest in web or mobile apps to help manage their type 2 diabetes, only a small number of older adults actually use them, says a new study. Approximately 2.2 million Canadians are living with type 2 diabetes, 2 million of whom are age 50 or older. A study found that although more t...
  • Family criticizing your weight? You might add more pounds
    Women whose loved ones are critical of their weight tend to put on even more pounds, says a new study on the way people's comments affect our health. "When we feel bad about our bodies, we often turn to loved ones -- families, friends and romantic partners -- for support and advice. How they respond...
  • Breakthrough in optical fiber communications
    Researchers from the University of Southampton have revealed a breakthrough in optical fiber communications. They developed an approach that enables direct modulation of laser currents to be used to generate highly advanced modulation format signals. The research explores a radically new approach to...
  • Europe shows that humans and large predators can share the same landscape
    The recovery of large carnivores in Europe is a great success for nature conservation. At one third of mainland Europe, at least one species of large carnivore is present, according to a new article. It is an excellent example that humans and carnivores can share the same landscape, say researchers.
  • Yellowstone's thermal springs: Their colors unveiled
    Researchers have created a simple mathematical model based on optical measurements that explains the stunning colors of Yellowstone National Park?s hot springs and can visually recreate how they appeared years ago, before decades of tourists contaminated the pools with make-a-wish coins and other de...
  • Gene critical for proper brain development discovered
    A genetic pathway has been found that accounts for the extraordinary size of the human brain. The research team has identified a gene, KATNB1, as an essential component in a genetic pathway responsible for central nervous system development in humans and other animals.
  • Helping parents understand infant sleep patterns
    Most parents are not surprised by the irregularity of a newborn infant's sleep patterns, but by six months or so many parents wonder if something is wrong with their baby or their sleeping arrangements if the baby is not sleeping through the night. Health-care providers, specifically nurse practitio...
  • A 'GPS' for molecules
    In everyday life, the global positioning system can be employed to reliably determine the momentary location of one en route to the desired destination. Scientists have now developed a molecular 'GPS' with which the whereabouts of metal ions in enzymes can be reliably determined. Such ions play impo...
  • A vegetarian carnivorous plant
    Carnivorous plants catch and digest tiny animals in order and derive benefits for their nutrition. Interestingly the trend towards vegetarianism seems to overcome carnivorous plants as well. The aquatic carnivorous bladderwort, which can be found in many lakes and ponds worldwide, does not only gain...
  • Cells identified that enhance tumor growth and suppress anti-cancer immune at...
    A study has identified the population of white blood cells that tumors use to enhance growth and suppress the disease-fighting immune system. The results mark a turning point in cancer immunology and provide the foundation for developing more effective immunotherapies.
  • Neuroscientists identify brain mechanisms that predict generosity in children
    Developmental neuroscientists have found specific brain markers that predict generosity in children. Those neural markers appear to be linked to both social and moral evaluation processes. Although young children are natural helpers, their perspective on sharing resources tends to be selfish.
  • Parents' BMI decreases with child involved in school-based, community obesity...
    Parents of children involved in an elementary school-based community intervention to prevent obesity appear to share in its health benefits. A new analysis shows an association between being exposed to the intervention as a parent and a modest decrease in body mass index (BMI) compared to parents in...
  • Quantum physics just got less complicated: Wave-particle duality and quantum ...
    Here's a nice surprise: quantum physics is less complicated than we thought. An international team of researchers has demonstrated that two peculiar features of the quantum world previously considered distinct are different manifestations of the same thing.
  • OCD patients' brains light up to reveal how compulsive habits develop
    Misfiring of the brain's control system might underpin compulsions in obsessive-compulsive disorder, according to researchers.
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